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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

3 edition of Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, Communications Workers of America found in the catalog.

Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, Communications Workers of America

Catherine Conroy

Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, Communications Workers of America

by Catherine Conroy

  • 6 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Microfilming Corporation of America in Sanford, N.C .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Betty Balanoff.
SeriesThe Twentieth century trade union woman ;, no. 5, New York Times oral history program
ContributionsBalanoff, Betty.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 2478 (H)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3211060M
LC Control Number83117910

National Archives Oral History Project The National Archives Oral History Project collects the historical experiences, insights, and perspectives of staff and former staff. The interviews help us understand the agency’s culture, work practices, decision-making processes, historical actions, and events, and they also help preserve the institutional memory of the National.   Documentary filmmakers Lance Warren and Hannah Ayers discuss tips for oral history interviews For more on the filmmakers and their latest film, visit

But that’s the message the vast majority of working women should be considering this Women’s History Month. The best way for the most women to improve their working lives is through a union. The new PBS documentary Makers: Women Who Make America shows how the women's movement changed the workplace for women, men and families. over thirty interviewees of the Women of Wisconsin Labor Oral History Project of the Wisconsin United Auto Workers). -- Catherine Conroy, Milwaukee (Communications Workers of America). -- Nellie Wilson, Milwaukee (A.O. Smith Steelworkers). -- Doris Thom, Janesville (Int'l Association of Machinists; United Auto.

Oral history is the collection and study of historical information about individuals, families, important events, or everyday life using audiotapes, videotapes, or transcriptions of planned interviews are conducted with people who participated in or observed past events and whose memories and perceptions of these are to be preserved as an aural record for future generations. Oral histories generally consist of three distinct phases: a pre-interview phase, the interview itself, and a post-interview phase. The Oral History Association maintains a statement of Best Practices addressing both the ethical principles and the practical steps involved in all three phases of a well-designed oral history .


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Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, Communications Workers of America by Catherine Conroy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, [Catherine Conroy; Elizabeth Banaloff; Wayne State University. Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs.; Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations (University of Michigan--Wayne State University).

Program on Women and Work.] -- Inthe Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations of the University of Michigan and. This book recognizes 11 women who helped to build the U.S. labor movement. In chapters based on oral history interviews, they tell stories illustrating the turmoil, hardships, and accomplishments of thousands of other union women activists.

Chapter 1,Cited by: 9. Papers of Catherine Conroy, a Wisconsin leader of the labor and women's movements, mainly consisting of correspondence, minutes, financial statements, photographs, and other records of her involvement with the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Communication Workers of America, the University of Wisconsin School for Workers, and the Wisconsin Women's Network.

Get this from a library. Oral history interview with Catherine Donahue in Clinton, Iowa, June Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy Donahue; Merle O Davis; Communications Workers of America.]. Inthe ITU merged into the Communication Workers of America (CWA).

The Women's International Auxiliary, a division of the ITU, disbanded in From the description of Women's International Auxiliary records, [ca. (Georgia State University). Conroy, Catherine. Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, The oral historian should talk with you about the motivations for initiating the project and conducting your oral history interview, as well as what they hope you might be able to contribute to the project.

The oral historian may ask you to make a formal declaration, which could either be recorded or in writing, of your agreement to participate. Use the search bar on the upper right to retrieve: Moments in Diplomatic History, Fascinating Figures, Books and Publications and other material. And don’t forget Poor Richard’s Podcasts.

For an Advanced Search of transcripts of over oral histories, see below. For tips on how to combine search terms click here. Advanced Search: Use the box below to search oral history transcripts.

A transcript of an oral history interview is, in the words of one style guide, “at best an imperfect representation of an oral interview.

The transcriber’s most important task is to render as close a replica to the actual event as possible. Accuracy, not speed, is the transcriber’s goal” (Baylor Style Guide).

Recording an oral history should be fun, not hard work. You can schedule another session at a later date if you want to continue recording the oral history. Suggested Topics and Questions for Oral Histories.

Below are some sample topics and questions that you can use when you record oral histories. Don't limit yourself to our suggestions, however.

Sample Questions To Conduct An Oral History Interview Please tell me your name, your birthdate, our relationship, and where we are. What was the happiest moment of your life. Who was the most important person in your life.

Can you tell me about him or her. View and download oral history essays examples. Also discover topics, titles, outlines, thesis statements, and conclusions for your oral history essay.

The benefits of using transcripts from the Flint Sit-Down Strike are the pure honesty that the workers spoke with. Most of the interviews took place in the s and s, but the strike.

Rocking the Boat recognizes the strong, committed women who helped to build the American labor movement. Through the stories of eleven women from a wide range of backgrounds, we experience the turmoil, hardships, and accomplishments of thousands of other union women activists through the period spanning the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the McCarthy era, the civil rights.

United Mine Workers of America (UMWA). This interview was marked restricted as of This interview is available in Catherwood Library on microfiche.

Box 1. For instance, you could check Ives, The Tape-recorded Interview, Neuenschwander, Oral History and the Law, or Sitton et al., Oral History, for some tried and true examples.

A release usually includes the interviewee's name and signature, the interviewer's name, the date, a statement of permission to use the interview, the name of the person or. ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM DONALD C. DAVIDSON LIBRARY David E: Russell, Director Santa Barbara, California () ORAL HISTORY METHODOLOGY, THE ART OF INTERVIEWING Oral history is as old as antiquity.

Herodotus, if you recall, set down many of his stories from accounts he heard an his travels. Jeannie Whayne, professor of history, replies: Perhaps the most important difference between oral history and traditional history is the personal nature of the former. Oral history typically involves interviews with individuals who either tell their life stories or focus on a certain aspect of their history.

1 4 Catherine Conroy Interviewed by Elizabeth Balanoff Communications Workers of America (CWA). This interview is available in Catherwood Library on microfiche. 1 5 Clara Day Interviewed by Elizabeth Balanoff International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT). This interview was marked restricted as of 1 6 Evelyn Dubrow Interviewed.

An oral history interview is not about the interviewer. The focus should be on the interviewee and they should do most of the talking, with occasional questions from you to guide them in directions you think are the most productive.

As indicated above, in general, a life history interview should proceed chronologically. Since. An oral history primer, Workingwomen's Roots, was published by the project and used in many high school and college classrooms and in union locals across the country.

The Anna Sullivan interview, edited by Lydia Kleiner and Brigid O'Farrell, appeared in the journal Frontier's in But there was no book celebrating all of these women and we. Conroy, Catherine Telephone worker and Communications Workers of America member; active in Coalition of Labor Union Women.

Oral History Interview, conducted by Elizabeth Balanoff, Milwaukee, The interview was conducted in conjunction an oral history project at the University of Michigan and was digitized by Roosevelt University Oral.

Making Sense of Oral History offers a place for students and teachers to begin working with oral history as historical evidence.

Written by Linda Shopes, this guide presents an overview of oral history and ways historians use it, tips on questions to ask when reading or listening to oral history interviews.Learn about the history of the U.S. House of Representatives through the perspectives of those who lived it.

The oral history program provides a vivid picture of the inner workings of Congress during some of the most influential times in our country’s modern history.

These interviews discuss the people, events, institutions, and objects of the ever-evolving House of Representatives.Guidelines for Oral History Interviews The History Channel Student Workbook (adapted from Michael Gatto) Why do some students hate to study history? History too often seems like the study of long.